COULD YOU HAVE ATTENDED THESE LECTURES?

(Are you sure?)

 

Lecture by Edward A. Kimball, June 13, 1898, Chicago, Illinois:

"The Auditorium was filled with an interesting assemblage last evening, the occasion being a lecture by Edward A. Kimball on the principles of Christian Science. The crowds began pouring into the building at 7:30 o'clock, and fifteen minutes later the ushers on the main floor found themselves without occupation. Every seat was taken and the overflow was diverted to the galleries. These were also filled before Judge Ewing rose from his chair on the platform to introduce the speaker. When the great building was filled to its utmost a great crowd still clamored at the doors for admittance, but were turned away. In the house there were 5000 people, and full 1000 more were turned away from the doors because they could not get in." (The Chicago Times-Herald, June 14, 1898, quoted in the Riverside Daily Press of Riverside, California, Sept. 12, 1898) "... many persons stood the entire evening. ... [Mr. Kimball] spoke two hours last night, but could have continued another hour without causing weariness on the part of his auditors." (The Chicago Inter-Ocean, June 14, 1898, quoted in The Salt Lake Herald, Sept. 4, 1898.)

 

Lecture by Edward A. Kimball, Oct. 24, 1898, Detroit, Michigan:

"A lecture was given here by Mr. Kimball on the 24th of October, and the Theatre which had been secured for the occasion was not only crowded, but hundreds went away who were unable to find standing room." (Report by Annie M. Knott in the Christian Science Sentinel of Nov. 17, 1898.)

 

Lecture by Carol Norton, Nov. 4, 1898, Utica, New York:

"Carol Norton of New York, a member of the Board of Lectureship of the Mother Church of Christian Science in Boston, lectured at the Auditorium last evening on 'Christian Science: What It Is and What It Is Not.' The Auditorium was completely thronged before 8 o'clock. The stage was filled with listeners, every seat was occupied, many stood in the aisles, and many could not gain admittance at all." (The Utica Observer, Nov. 5, 1898)

 

Lecture by Carol Norton, Dec. 18, 1898, New York, New York:

"Carnegie Hall was the scene of a remarkable mass meeting yesterday afternoon, the occasion being a lecture delivered by Carol Norton, C. S. B., on 'Christian Science; its Religion, Healing, Therapeutics, and Philosophy.' ... The lecture was announced for half past three, but when the Postscript reporter entered the hall at 3.35 many people were coming away, unable to gain admission. Excepting a few rear gallery seats, the auditorium was taxed to its utmost capacity. On the platform were many prominent Scientists. All told, more than three thousand people were present." (The Harlem Postscript, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, Jan. 5, 1899)

 

Lecture by Carol Norton, Feb. 27, 1899, Troy, New York:

"It is more than probable that never in the history of Music Hall has it contained a larger audience than it did Monday evening, February 27, when Carol Norton, C.S.D., lectured on 'Christian Science and Common Sense.' Numbers were turned away disappointed who could not gain admission to the hall, and every seat was taken some time before the time for the lecture. Not only did those directly interested in Christian Science attend, but many who wished to make honest investigation into the religion that is gaining widespread attention all over the civilized world, and is demanding recognition by its attested works. From observation it was patent that representatives from every church in the city were present, and all were deeply interested in the lecture, presenting what Christian Science is and what it can do and has done." (The Troy Record, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, March 9, 1899)

 

Lecture by William P. McKenzie, April 3, 1899, Chelsea, Massachusetts:

"Rev. William P. McKenzie, C.S.B., member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship of the Boston Church of Christian Science, gave a lecture on Christian Science from the view-point of a Christian Scientist, at the Unitarian Church Monday night, April 3. About eight hundred people were present. By reason of recent events in Chelsea which have been given much publicity by the newspapers, Christian Science had been the subject of a great deal of discussion in this city for the past several weeks. The announcement of the lecture was sufficient, therefore, to attract more than enough people to fill the church. Many of the audience stood throughout the delivery of Mr. McKenzie's lecture, and it is estimated that several hundred people were turned away because of the lack of seats for them." (The Chelsea Pioneer, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, April 20, 1899)

 

Lecture by Carol Norton, April 4, 1899, Berlin, Ontario, Canada:

"The largest audience in the history of the Opera House was present Tuesday evening, April 4, to hear Carol Norton, C.S.D., deliver a lecture on 'Christian Science.' Hundreds were turned away because of their inability to obtain seats."  (The Berlin News Record, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, April 20, 1899)

 

Lecture by Irving C. Tomlinson, April 5, 1899, Boston, Massachusetts:

"Among the notable events in the history of Christian Science in the city of Boston, was the occasion of the delivery of the lecture of Rev. Irving C. Tomlinson, C.S.B., of Concord, N. H., at Music Hall, April 5, 1899. This lecture was delivered under the auspices of the Mother Church, The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Mass., and was one of the regular quarterly lectures.

"Since the inauguration of the quarterly lectures they have been delivered (in Boston) in the auditorium of the Mother Church, but owing to the overcrowded condition of the auditorium at previous lectures, it was thought best to secure a larger place. Accordingly, Music Hall was secured for the lecture in question.

"Although notice had not been extensively published, early in the evening crowds began to assemble in the hall, and long before the hour for the commencement of the lecture the hall was completely filled. When the lecture opened every seat was occupied, and not less than a thousand persons were standing in the aisles and by the doorways, and in the corridors, filling the doorways. Several hundred went away unable to find seats or standing room, such as would enable them to hear." (The Christian Science Sentinel, April 13, 1899.)

 

Lecture by William G. Ewing, Oct. 17, 1899, Des Moines, Iowa:

"Foster's Opera House was crowded to its capacity and many were turned away Tuesday evening, October 17, the occasion being the lecture by Judge William G. Ewing of Chicago, on Christian Science. By the time the lecturer was presented the house was so full that it was necessary to place a guard at the door with strict orders to admit nobody. The seats were all taken and people stood in the rear, at the sides, and in the aisles. A considerable number secured the privileges of the stage, and occupied seats in the wings." (The Des Moines Leader, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, Nov. 2, 1899)

 

Lecture by William G. Ewing, Nov. 7, 1899, Milwaukee, Wisconsin:

"Plymouth Church was filled with one of the largest audiences that ever assembled in that edifice Tuesday evening, November 7, to listen to the lecture of ex-Judge William G. Ewing of Chicago, on the subject of Christian Science. Every seat in the church was occupied and chairs were placed in the aisles to accommodate the people. Many were turned away, unable to gain admission." (The Milwaukee Sentinel, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, Nov. 23, 1899)

 

Lecture by William G. Ewing, Jan. 4, 1900, Chicago, Illinois:

"William G. Ewing lectured on Christian Science last night (Thursday, January 4) to one of the largest audiences ever assembled in the North Side Jewish Temple, LaSalle Avenue and Goethe Street. Long before the hour for the lecture every seat in the large edifice was filled, as well as chairs which had been placed in the aisles. Several hundred persons, unable to find seats, were turned away." (Chicago Times-Herald, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, March 15, 1900)

 

Lecture by William G. Ewing, Feb. 25, 1900, Riverside, California:

"The announcement that Judge William G. Ewing, of the Superior Court of Illinois, would lecture at the Loring Opera House, Riverside, Sunday evening on 'Christian Science as the Religion of Jesus Christ,' drew from San Bernardino quite an audience, the First Church of Christ, Scientist, sending over a load on the Stewart bus and a few on the motor, while a number of persons who had formerly been interested in Christian Science drove over with a tally-ho. The Loring Opera House was packed to the doors and large numbers were unable to gain admittance." (The Weekly Sun of San Bernardino, California, March 2, 1900)

 

Lecture by William G. Ewing, March 1, 1900, San Jose, California:

"The widespread interest that is taken in the doctrines of Christian Science was clearly manifested at the Victory Theatre last evening (Thursday, March 1), the occasion being the address of Hon. William G. Ewing of Chicago, who had announced as his topic 'Christian Science, the Religion of Jesus Christ.' A half hour before the time set for the meeting to open every seat in the building was occupied, many persons were standing in the aisles and lobbies, and many more turned away on seeing the crowded condition of the building." (The San Jose Daily Mercury, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, March 22, 1900)

 

Lecture by William G. Ewing, March 5, 1900, Portland, Oregon:

"Ex-Judge William G. Ewing delivered an interesting lecture on 'Christian Science the Religion of Jesus Christ,' before an audience which filled the First Church of Christ, Scientist, to the doors, Monday evening. Hundreds stood throughout the lecture, and the ushers were compelled to turn away more than 1000 for lack of room." (The Portland Oregonian, March 9, 1900)

 

Lecture by William G. Ewing, March 22, 1900, Denver, Colorado:

"The enthusiasm with which Judge Ewing of Chicago was greeted upon the occasion of his lecture on Christian Science at the Central Presbyterian Church Thursday evening (March 22), has not been excelled since the days when Mr. [William Jennings] Bryan visited Denver in 1896 [to attend the Democratic National Convention at which he was nominated candidate for president of the United States]. No lecturer who ever visited Denver was greeted by so large an audience. The great auditorium of the church was wholly inadequate to accommodate those who sought admission. The sidewalk in front of the church was black with people an hour and a half before time for the lecture, and hundreds of people were turned away, unable to get within hearing distance of the lecturer." (The Denver Evening Times, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, April 12, 1900)

 

Lecture by Edward A. Kimball, Sept. 30, 1900, Kansas City, Missouri:

"Edward A. Kimball, C.S.D., of Chicago, lectured to an audience of 10,000 persons in Convention hall yesterday afternoon. ... Mr. Kimball said it was the largest audience he had ever addressed. The arena floor was packed long before 3 o'clock, the hour set for opening the meeting. The east and west area balconies were filled, several hundreds occupied the colonnade balconies and there was a large overflow into the tiers of seats in the south end of the building, where it was difficult to hear." (Kansas City Star, Oct. 1, 1900) [In a letter to Mary Baker Eddy dated Oct. 29, 1900, Kimball wrote:] "This is the hall where Mr. Bryan was nominated [at the Democratic National Convention of 1900 as candidate for president of the United States], and the audience was enormous. The newspapers stated that there were ten thousand people there, but the number really was eight thousand." (The Christian Science Journal, November 1900)]

 

Lecture by Edward A. Kimball, Oct. 9, 1900, Chicago, Illinois:

"The Chicago Record of October 10 says: 'Twelve thousand people thronged the Coliseum last night to listen to Edward A. Kimball, chairman of the international board of lectureship of the mother church of Christian science at Boston, speak on the 'Cause and Scientific Cure of Disease.' The audience was made up mainly of Christian Scientists, who warmly applauded the speaker, but there were also present many persons to whom the teachings of Mrs. Mary Eddy, the founder of the science, were new.[']" (Kimball-Family News of Topeka, Kansas, October, 1900) "In our last issue we made mention of the remarkable demonstration at Kansas City on the occasion of Mr. Kimball's lecture there. Now come to us reports of another remarkable demonstration in Chicago on the occasion of Mr. Kimball's lecture in that city, in the Coliseum, before an audience variously estimated at from seven to fifteen thousand people. Whatever number was really there, the fact seems to be clear that the large Coliseum was filled to overflowing by an eager and attentive audience." (The Christian Science Sentinel, Oct. 18, 1900)

 

Lecture by Joseph R. Clarkson, Oct. 21, 1900, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania:

"The success of the lecture given last Sunday afternoon at Horticultural Hall by Judge Joseph R. Clarkson, shows that Christian Science is steadily growing and gaining in this city of Brotherly Love. The hall was filled to overflowing, and many were turned away." (Letter dated Oct. 26, 1900 by Henrietta E. Chanfrau to the Christian Science Sentinel, Nov. 1, 1899)

 

Lecture by Arthur R. Vosburgh, Oct. 1, 1901, Bobcaygeon, Ontario, Canada:

"A meeting in the interest of Christian Science was held at the Town Hall, Bobcaygeon, on Tuesday evening (October 1), and after the hall and stairways were closely packed, a large number were unable to gain admission. ... Mr. Todd occupied the chair, and the lecturer was Rev. A. R. Vosburgh of Rochester, who presented his subject in a manner that left a decidedly favorable impression upon his audience." (The Bobcaygeon Independent, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, Oct. 24, 1901)

 

Lecture by Edward A. Kimball, Jan. 31, 1902, Chicago, Illinois:

"Mr. Edward A. Kimball lectured at First Church of Christ, Scientist, of Chicago, January 31, and in addition to the people occupying the fifteen hundred seats, nearly a thousand stood throughout the lecture, and several hundred, possibly a thousand, were turned away because of lack of room." (The Christian Science Sentinel, Feb. 20, 1902)

 

Lecture by William G. Ewing, Feb. 12, 1902, Los Angeles, California:

"Simpson Auditorium was crowded to the limit of its capacity, while hundreds were unable to gain admission to hear the lecture by Judge William G. Ewing of Chicago on 'Christian Science: Physician and Redeemer.'" (The Los Angeles Times, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, March 13, 1902. The date of the lecture, not given by the Sentinel, was found in an advertisement in The Los Angeles Herald, Feb. 9, 1902.)

 

Lecture by William G. Ewing, Feb. 18, 1902, Oakland, California:

"First Church of Christ, Scientist, in this city, was crowded to the limit of its capacity last evening (February 18), while many were unable to gain admission, to hear Judge William G. Ewing of Chicago, lecture on Christian Science." (The Oakland Times, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, March 20, 1902)

 

Lecture by Edward A. Kimball, Feb. 23, 1902, Saint Paul, Minnesota:

"E. A. Kimball, of Chicago, a lecturer of The First Church of Christ, Scientist, of Boston, spoke before an audience in the Grand Opera House yesterday afternoon that completely filled the structure. Every seat down stairs was filled, the balcony was in a like condition, and the gallery held its quota. Those that arrived late in the afternoon were obliged to stand in the aisles and many had to leave owing to the lack of room." (The Saint Paul Globe of Saint Paul, Minnesota, Feb. 24, 1902)

 

Lecture by William G. Ewing, March 2, 1902, Seattle, Washington:

"On Sunday, March 2, a large and appreciative audience of nearly three thousand people greeted Judge William G. Ewing at the Grand Opera House. In the balcony and on the main floor all the standing-room was occupied. Several hundred were turned away for lack of room." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, April 3, 1902)

 

Lecture by Edward A. Kimball, March 4, 1902, Cleveland, Ohio:

"On Tuesday evening, March 4, Mr. Edward A. Kimball, C.S.D., of Chicago, Ill., delivered a lecture in the new church edifice of First Church of Christ, Scientist, of Cleveland, O. The lecture was given under the auspices of First and Second Churches of Christ, Scientist.

"The people began to assemble at the church edifice more than an hour before the time for the lecture to begin, and long before the appointed hour every seat in the large auditorium was occupied and hundreds filled the aisles and passage-ways, and even stood on the stairs and in the foyer below, getting as near the opening into the auditorium as possible in order to catch some part of the lecture, and many were turned away that could not find even standing-room." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, March 27, 1902)

 

Lecture by William G. Ewing, May 1902, Manchester, England:

"Manchester lecture immense success. Thousand people present and many turned away for lack of room. Our grateful thanks for sending Judge." (Cablegram dated May 9, 1902 to Mary Baker Eddy from Victoria Murray, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, June 12, 1902)

 

Lecture by Septimus J. Hanna, Nov. 23, 1902, Denver, Colorado:

"Judge Septimus J. Hanna lectured on Christian Science at the Broadway Theatre yesterday afternoon [November 23]. The theatre was crowded even beyond the point of 'standing room only,' and many were turned away." (The Denver News, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, Dec. 18, 1902)

 

Lecture by Carol Norton, Feb. 22, 1903, Seattle, Washington:

"On Sunday, February 22, Mr. Norton lectured in Seattle at the Grand Opera House to more than two thousand people. The boxes were filled with officers of neighboring churches and prominent people of the city. Standing room was taken and hundreds were turned away for want of room. The audience was interested and most attentive. The seventeen hundred Sentinels provided for distribution did not meet the demand." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, March 21, 1903)

 

Lecture by Septimus J. Hanna, April 9, 1903, Boston, Massachusetts:

"The semi-annual lecture in the Mother Church was delivered by Judge Septimus J. Hanna, C.S.D., in Symphony Hall, Thursday evening, April 9, before an impressive audience.

"Every seat was taken and every available foot of standing space was occupied, and hundreds were compelled to turn away before the hour of the lecture had arrived."

"The very large attendance at the semi-annual lecture of the Mother Church given in Symphony Hall, Boston, when several hundred persons, probably a thousand, were turned away for lack of room, indicates that suffering and disheartened humanity is still seeking a practical means of escape from pain, sin, sickness, and sorrow, and that the means heretofore employed for relief from these relentless task-masters, have been largely unavailing." (From two articles in the Christian Science Sentinel, April 18, 1903)

 

Lecture by Septimus J. Hanna, April 23, 1903, Chicago, Illinois:

"Judge Septimus J. Hanna, C.S.D., delivered a lecture on Christian Science at Second Church of Christ, Scientist, of Chicago, Thursday, April 23. The church, which seats fifteen hundred people, was crowded by a large and appreciative audience. It is estimated that the standing space was occupied by about four hundred people, and several hundred were turned away." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, May 16, 1903)

 

Lecture by Carol Norton, April 26, 1903, Kansas City, Missouri:

"An audience of nearly two thousand people crowded into the Christian Science Church, Ninth and Forest Avenue, yesterday afternoon [April 26] to hear a Christian Science lecture by Carol Norton, C.S.D., of New York City. Hundreds of people were unable to gain admittance into the church." (The Christian Science Sentinel, June 20, 1903)

 

Lecture by Septimus J. Hanna, Nov. 15, 1903, Portland, Oregon:

"One of the largest audiences which ever filled the Marquam Grand Theater attended the Christian Science rally held under the auspices of the local Science church yesterday afternoon. The principal speaker of the occasion was Judge Septimus J. Hanna, of the Board of Lectureship ...

"Long before 2 o'clock, the hour set for the meeting, the lobby of the theater was filled with an eager crowd, which overflowed into the street, and when the seating capacity of the auditorium and stage had been exhausted the doors were closed upon several hundred people who were unable to gain admission." (The Morning Oregonian, Nov. 16, 1903)

"The Portland Telegram, reporting his recent lecture in that city, says: 'Judge Septimus J. Hanna, Christian Science lecturer, delivered an address yesterday afternoon regarding the principles of his church before an audience that filled the Marquam Grand Theater to overflowing. Chairs were placed on the stage for nearly 300 persons and scores stood in the rear of the house. Several hundred were turned away because of lack of room.[']" (The San Jose Mercury News, Nov. 20, 1903)

 

Lecture by Septimus J. Hanna, Nov. 24, 1903, Oakland, California:

"Many who turned out last night to hear Judge J. R. [sic] Hanna of Boston discourse on Christian Science were disappointed because of lack of room. At 8 o'clock there was not standing room left in the First Chruch of Christ, Scientist, corner Seventeenth and Franklin Streets." (The Oakland Tribune, Nov. 25, 1903)

 

Lecture by Edward A. Kimball, Nov. 24, 1903, New York, New York:

"Mr. Edward A. Kimball delivered a lecture November 24, at Second Church of Christ, Scientist, New York City. The lecture was given under the auspices of Second and Fourth Churches. The church was crowded and many failed to gain admittance." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, Jan. 16, 1904)

 

Lecture by Edward A. Kimball, Dec. 8, 1903, Boston, Massachusetts:

"The semi-annual lecture under the auspices of the Mother Church was given before a splendid audience in Symphony Hall, Tuesday evening, the 8th inst., by Edward A. Kimball, C.S.D. Every part of the vast auditorium was crowded and a large number were unable to gain admittance." (The Christian Science Sentinel, Dec. 12, 1903.)

 

Lecture by Septimus J. Hanna, Dec. 13, 1903, Los Angeles, California:

"A lecture delivered by Judge S. J. Hanna, Sunday, December 13, in the new Mason Opera House, gave further evidence of the interest of the public. Two thousand were seated, all the available standing room occupied, and hundreds were turned away." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, April 9, 1904)

 

Lecture by Septimus J. Hanna, Feb. 7, 1904, Salt Lake City, Utah:

"A record-breaking lecture audience greeted Judge Septimus J. Hanna at the Salt Lake Theatre last night [February 7] to hear his address on Christian Science. The theatre was literally filled from pit to dome, and several hundred were turned away on account of the lack of room." (The Salt Lake Tribune, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, March 26, 1904)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, Feb. 21, 1904, Minneapolis, Minnesota:

"Several hundred people were unable to secure seats at the Metropolitan opera-house yesterday afternoon, on the occasion of a lecture on Christian Science by Bicknell Young, C.S.B., of Chicago." (The Minneapolis Journal, Feb. 22, 1904)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, April 5, 1904, Chicago, Illinois:

"An interesting lecture was given in Second Church of Christ, Scientist, of this city, April 5, by Bicknell Young of Chicago. Every seat was taken, many stood throughout the entire lecture, and many were turned away for want of room." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, May 14, 1904)

 

Lecture by Septimus J. Hanna, April 12, 1904, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania:

"Judge Hanna's lecture of two weeks ago was a most happy and profitable occasion. The gentleman who introduced him is Judge William B. Hanna, who for many years has been the President Judge of the Orphans' Court, and also President of the Trustees of Hahnemann Medical College. The lecture was held in the auditorium of the Presbyterian Board of Publication, the most conservatively managed hall in the city. Many clergymen were present, and the attendance was so large that hundreds of people were turned away unable to get in." (Letter dated April 26, 1904 to Mary Baker Eddy by Albert E. Miller, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, May 7, 1904) "The hall was crowded to its full capacity and several hundred were turned away for lack of even standing room." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, May 28, 1904)

 

Lecture by W. D. McCrackan, April 28, 1904, New York, New York:

"W. D. McCrackan, C.S.B., delivered his first lecture in New York City on Thursday evening, April 28, at Fifth Church of Christ, Scientist. The church was crowded to the doors, two hundred extra chairs were provided, and many who were unable to obtain seats stood during the entire lecture. A large number were unable to gain admission." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, June 4, 1904)

 

Lecture by Edward A. Kimball, May 12 & 13, 1904, Chicago, Illinois:

"Two immense throngs of people crowded into First Church of Christ, Scientist, of Chicago, on Thursday and Friday evenings, May 12 and 13, to hear Mr. Kimball's lecture. Two evenings were provided in order that all who might wish to attend one lecture could be accommodated, it having been given out that those who attended Thursday night were not expected to come the following evening. Notwithstanding the large seating capacity of the auditorium of the church, with its fifteen hundred seats and its broad foyers where hundred stood throughout the lectures, the doors had to be closed at eight o'clock each evening, in order that the building ordinances of the city relating to person blocking up aisles and stairways, might not be violated. When the doors were closed, hundreds were left standing, eager to gain admission. While it seems a hardship not to be able to accommodate all who come long distances to hear a Christian Science lecture, still that fact alone impresses people, and they learn that it is necessary to be prompt in attending these lectures if they would share in the feast. The probable number in attendance was thirty-five hundred." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, July 30, 1904)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, Oct. 16, 1904, Concord, New Hampshire:

"Mr. Bicknell Young of Chicago, lectured on Christian Science in the new First Church of Christ, Scientist, Sunday evening [October 16] at 7.30. The audience was a thoroughly representative one, every seat in the beautiful auditorium being taken. Many stood throughout the evening, and hundreds of others who desired to hear the words of Mr. Young were unable to gain admission. Several prominent Christian Scientists were present from Boston, and a large delegation came up from Manchester." (The Concord Patriot, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, Oct. 29, 1904)

 

Lecture by Edward A. Kimball, Nov. 11, 1904, Chicago, Illinois

"Edward A. Kimball, C.S.D., delivered a lecture on Christian Science Friday evening, under the auspices of Fifth Church of Christ, Scientist, of Chicago, this being the first lecture given by that church. The large auditorium of the University Congregational church in which the lecture was delivered, was completely filled, and many people were turned away before the time for the lecture to begin." (The Iowa City Press-Citizen of Iowa City, Iowa, Nov. 16, 1904)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, Nov. 13, 1904, Salt Lake City, Utah:

"The lecture on Christian Science given by Bicknell Young, C.S.B., of Chicago in the Salt Lake Theater Sunday evening attracted a crowd that filled the building to its utmost capacity. Many were turned away unable to secure seats." (Salt Lake City Telegram, Nov. 14, 1904)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, Dec. 11, 1904, Porland, Oregon:

"At these lectures given in the past the capacity of the Marquam has been taxed to its limit, and at this time in order to insure seats to those of the public who especially wish to hear Mr. Young, arrangements have been made to issue complimentary reserve-seat tickets at the box office of the theater the Saturday before the lecture. These tickets will reserve seating until 15 minutes before 8 o'clock, after which time the seats will be thrown open to the public." (The Oregonian, Dec. 4, 1904. The report of the lecture in The Oregonian, Dec. 12, 1904, noted that a "sea of faces" was present.)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, Dec. 17, 1904, San Francisco, California:

"A very successful lecture was given here December 17 by Mr. Bicknell Young to a crowded house, over two thousand being present, and hundreds turned away who were unable to enter." (The Christian Science Sentinel, Feb. 25, 1905)

 

Lecture by Sue Harper Mims, Jan. 15, 1905, Cleveland, Ohio:

"Hundreds of people were turned away from Chamber of Commerce Hall yesterday who went there to hear the lecture on Christian Science given by Mrs. Sue Harper Mims, C.S.D., a member of the Christian Science board of lectureship of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, of Boston, Mass.

"The auditorium proved inadequate for the accommodation of the large audience, and many did not hear the lecture, which was given under the auspices of the Second Church of Christ, Scientist, of this city." (The Cleveland Leader, Jan. 16, 1905.) "The seating capacity of the auditorium was taxed to its utmost and fully 500 people were unable to gain admittance." (The Plain Dealer of Cleveland, Ohio, Jan. 16, 1905)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, Feb. 10, 1905, Denver, Colorado:

"Despite the unfavorable weather a great audience gathered last evening at the Christian Science church, Fourteenth and Logan avenues, to listen to Bicknell Young's lecture on 'Christian Science.'

"Long before the lecture began every available seat in the main auditorium was filled, the crowd overflowing into the galleries and aisles and filling even the foyer beneath the auditorium. Fully 2,500 people heard the lecture, while several hundred were turned away, unable even to find standing room." (The Denver Post, Feb. 11, 1905.)

 

Lecture by Mary Brookins, March 19, 1905, Minneapolis, Minnesota:

"An audience of more than 2,000 persons gathered at the Metropolitan operahouse yesterday to hear the address of Miss Mary Brookins, C.S.B., on Christian Science. Several hundred, whom it was impossible to seat, were turned away." (The Minneapolis Journal, March 20, 1905)

 

Lecture by Edward A. Kimball, April 2, 1905, Portland, Oregon:

"The Christian Science lecture given by Edward A. Kimball, C.S.D., at the Marquam Grand Theater last night under the auspices of the First and Second Churches of Christ, Scientist, of Portland, attracted an audience which completely filled the theater and made it necessary to turn away several hundred people." (The Morning Oregonian, April 3, 1905)

 

Lecture by Sue Harper Mims, April 13, 1905, Boston, Massachusetts:

"Two thousand persons were turned away from the semi-annual lecture of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, at Symphony Hall last night because fully as many had gotten into the hall before them. Never before in the history of the Christian Science belief in Boston has so large a crowd attempted to hear a Christian Science lecturer. Mrs. Sue Harper Mims of Atlanta, Ga., gave the lecture." (The Boston Journal, April 14, 1905)

 

Lecture by Edward A. Kimball, Sept. 28, 1905, Chicago, Illinois:

"The new edifice of Fifth Church, 4840 Madison Avenue, was filled to overflowing, and hundreds were turned away who were unable to gain admittance. The large audience listened attentively to Mr. Kimball, who spoke particularly in refutation of many of the misrepresentations which are prevalent regarding Christian Science." (The Chicago Post, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, Nov. 11, 1905; this was the lecture "The Theology of Christian Science," published in The Chicago Evening Post, Sept. 29, 1905)

 

Lecture by Mary Brookins, Oct. 10, 1905, Oakland, California:

"A large audience greeted Miss Mary Brookins last night [October 10] at the Macdonough Theatre. Long before eight o'clock every available seat had been taken and many were turned away from the doors." (The Oakland Enquirer, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, Dec. 16, 1905) "As many people as were allowed under the law were admitted to standing room in the rear of the balcony and main floor, but there were many who sought admittance and were turned away from the doors." (The Oakland Tribune, Oct. 11, 1905) "Here in Oakland we have had another demonstration of the great interest in Christian Science. The theater, one of the largest, was packed and about five hundred people were turned away. Each morning, anew, I put my work into God's care and keeping, and it is nothing less than wonderful to see how each step is shielded and directed by His all-loving power." (Letter to Mary Baker Eddy by Mary Brookins dated Oct. 11, 1905 and printed in the Christian Science Sentinel, Nov. 4, 1905)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, November 1905, Glasgow, Scotland:

"In November, 1905, Christian Science Reading Rooms were opened, and our first lecture given by Mr. Bicknell Young. The hall was crowded with an attentive and interested audience, and many were unable to gain admission." (Letter from four Christian Scientists to Mary Baker Eddy, published in the Christian Science Sentinel, April 7, 1906)

 

Lecture by Hermann S. Hering, Nov. 12, 1905, Everett, Massachusetts:

"The meeting was held in Everett hall, Everett sq. and was under the auspices of the First church of Christ, Scientist, of Malden. The speaker was Prof. Hermann S. Hering, CSB., member of the Christian Science board of lectureship of the Boston church, and formerly for three years first reader in the Boston church. The hall was filled to overflowing 10 minutes after the doors were opened, and several hundred were unable to gain admission. Fully 800 were crowded into the hall, and every available space, including the platform, was filled with those desirous to hear first-handed of the teaching of this growing religious movement." (The Boston Daily Globe, Nov. 13, 1905)

 

Lecture by Sue Harper Mims, Feb. 4, 1906, San Francisco, California:

"A crowd that filled the great assembly room of the church at Post and Taylor streets yesterday afternoon and occupied every available bit of space in the halls listened to Mrs. Sue Harper Mimms of Atlanta, Ga., member of the Board of Lectureship of The First Church of Christ, Scientist, discuss the principles and the practical workings of the Christian Science religion. At the same time hundreds were turned away because of the want of room for them to stand." (The San Francisco Call, Feb. 5, 1906)

 

Lecture by Clarence A. Buskirk, Feb. 11, 1906, Worcester, Massachusetts:

"Hon. Clarence A. Buskirk of Princeton, Ind., delivered a lecture yesterday afternoon [Feb. 11] in Franklin Square Theatre on Christian Science. After every seat on the first and second floors of the theatre had been occupied, and every chair in the six boxes taken, people were turned away." (The Worcester Telegram, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, March 10, 1906)

 

Lecture by Sue Harper Mims, Feb. 18, 1906, Spokane, Washington:

"Mrs. Sue Harper Mims delivered a lecture upon Christian Science Sunday afternoon, Feb. 18, in the Auditorium Theatre, to a large and appreciative audience, every chair being taken from the main floor to the gallery, all standing space occupied, and many being turned away." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, March 24, 1906)

 

Lecture by Bliss Knapp, March 6, 1906, Minneapolis, Minnesota:

"Bliss Knapp, C.S.B., of Boston, lectured in behalf of Christian Science at the Second church, Second avenue S and Eleventh street, last evening. The audience filled the church to overflowing. Over eighteen hundred followers of the church as well as friends to whom Christian Science is still a closed book, made up the audience, and [in order to] accommodate all, chairs had to be placed in the aisles and in the rear of the church." (The Minneapolis Journal, March 7, 1906)

 

Lecture by Hermann S. Hering, Oct. 16, 1906, Boston, Massachusetts:

"An appreciative audience which not only filled the five thousands seats of the new auditorium of The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, but likewise all the available standing-room, listened with close attention to the lecture delivered Tuesday evening, Oct. 16, by Prof. Hermann S. Hering, C.S.B. The seats on the main floor were filled before quarter past seven, and quarter of an hour later every seat in the gaileries had been taken. Many persons who could not obtain even standing-room went away." (The Christian Science Sentinel, Oct. 20, 1906)

 

Lecture by Mary Brookins, Nov. 1, 1906, Cambridge, Massachusetts:

"Odd Fellows hall, North Cambridge, was filled to the doors and many hundreds were turned away on the occasion of the lecture on 'Christian Science,' given under the auspices of First Church of Christ, Scientist, this city, Thursday eve., Nov. 1, by Miss Mary Brookins, C.S.B., member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship of The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Mass." (The Cambridge Chronicle, Nov. 3, 1906)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, Feb. 28, 1907, Denver, Colorado:

"One thousand people were turned away from the First Church of Christ, Scientist, last night, because the auditorium of the big stone edifice was already crowded beyond its capacity by those who went to hear the lecture of Bicknell Young of Boston, on 'Christian Science.'" (The Denver Post, March 1, 1907.)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, March 3, 1907, Kansas City, Kansas:

"An audience which filled to its utmost capacity the Portsmouth auditorium, Kansas City, Kansas, assembled yesterday to hear a lecture on Christian Science, delivered by Bicknell Young of Chicago, a member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship. So large was the crowd that it was estimated that 500 persons were unable to gain admittance to the hall." (The Kansas City Globe, March 4, 1907)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, March 7 & 8, 1907, Chicago, Illinois:

"The six Churches of Christ, Scientist, of Chicago, recently united in providing a free public lecture on Christian Science in the great Auditorium. This lecture was given by Bicknell Young on the evenings of March 7 and 8. The Auditorium, which seats over four thousand persons, was more than filled on the first evening, and on the second evening over one thousand persons were turned away." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, April 6, 1907)

 

Lecture by Septimus J. Hanna, March 11, 1907, Chicago, Illinois

"Former Judge Septimus J. Hanna, of Colorado Springs, lectured on 'Christian Science, the Religion of the Bible,' in Second Church of Christ, Scientist, last evening [March 11]. The large auditorium of the church, seating fifteen hundred persons, was crowded, and several hundred were unable to gain admission." (The Chicago Post, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, April 13, 1907)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, March 25, 1907, New York, New York:

"Mr. Bicknell Young delivered a lecture on Christian Science at First Church of Christ, Scientist, Monday night, March 25, to an audience that was probably as representative as any audience ever assembled in New York City. It was composed to a large extent of non-Scientists. Every available space in the church was filled and great numbers of people were turned away." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, May 4, 1907)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, April 23, 1907, London, England

"... Mr. Bicknell Young, of Chicago, lectured on Christian Science at Albert Hall, London, before an audience of over nine thousand, which completely filled the auditorium, many being turned away at the door." (The International Yearbook for 1907 of Dodd, Mead and Company, p. 173) "When London found there was to be a Christian Science lecture in the Albert Hall, London smiled, and asked who was going to fill it. The question was answered when the time came. The inspector in charge of the police outside the hall, when he saw the crowd collecting, declared he had never anticipated anything like it, or he would have had many more men; however, he had no need for them. The attendants inside thought it in the nature of a hardship that the doors were opened so long before the time. They smiled and said all the people who would come could easily get in much later. When the doors were opened and the audience began to surge in by thousands, they altered their minds. For the next hour they were kept busy trying to find seats for the crowd at the doors. Long before the organ ceased to play every available seat was filled, and numbers of people were going disconsolately away." (The Christian Science Sentinel, May 18, 1907, quoting The Tribune) "Thousands were not able to enter the hall." (The Cross and the Crown by Norman Beasley, p. 377)

 

Lecture by Septimus J. Hanna, April 30, 1907, Boston Massachusetts:

"Before more than six thousand persons, who occupied all seats and all standing-room, to the exclusion of several hundred others turned away at the doors, Judge Septimus J. Hanna of Colorado Springs, Col., at The First Church of Christ, Scientist, last evening spoke for over an hour on the fundamental teachings of Christian Science and the marvelous growth of the cult, and eloquently eulogized Mrs. Mary Baker G. Eddy. It was the regular semi-annual lecture at the church, which was practically filled soon after six o'clock." (The Boston Journal, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, May 11, 1907)

 

Lecture by Clarence A. Buskirk, June 6, 1907, Chicago, Illinois:

"The large auditorium of Fifth Church of Christ, Scientist, was crowded last evening [June 6] when the Hon. Clarence A. Buskirk of St. Louis lectured on Christian Science. The lecture will be repeated to-night [June 7] for the benefit of those who were unable to gain admission last night." (The Chicago Journal, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, July 27, 1907)

 

Lecture by Clarence A. Buskirk, October (?) 1907, London England:

"The lectures are over, and have been an enormous success. The hall was crammed, people standing, people sitting on the stairs, numbers turned away. Every lecture seems to be a greater success than the one before it. In London this is a miracle." (Letter dated Oct. 22, 1907 from Frederick Dixon to Archibald McLellan, printed in the Christian Science Sentinel, Nov. 16, 1907)

 

Lecture by Francis J. Fluno, Oct. 22, 1907, Boston, Massachusetts:

"On Tuesday evening, Oct. 22, Dr. Francis J. Fluno, C.S.D., of Oakland, Cal., delivered a lecture on Christian Science in The Mother Church, The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Mass., to an immense audience. The lecture began at eight o'clock, but by seven o'clock all the seats on the floor were occupied and very few were vacant in the galleries. Many who were unable to get seats remained standing throughout the lecture, while a number went away. There must have been between five and six thousand people in the church, as it seats five thousand." (The Christian Science Sentinel, Nov. 2, 1907)

 

Lecture by Francis J. Fluno, Nov. 17, 1907, Portland, Oregon:

"Francis J. Fluno, M.D., C.S.D., a member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, lectured to a large audience in the Hellig Theater yesterday afternoon. Every seat in the theater was filled, many were standing, and about 200 were seated on the stage. About 1900 in all heard the lecture, which was perhaps the most successful of the many Christian Science lectures given here. A number of persons who sought admission after the theater was filled were turned away." (The Oregonian, Nov. 18, 1907)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, Dec. 2, 1907, Milwaukee, Wisconsin:

"That the study of Christian Science is being investigated more to-day than ever before in the city of Milwaukee was demonstrated last evening [Dec. 2] at the Pabst Theater, where hundreds were unable to gain admittance to a lecture given by Bicknell Young of Chicago." (The Sentinel of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, Jan. 25, 1908)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, Jan. 19, 1908, San Francisco, California:

"In Dreamland Rink, San Francisco last Sunday, five thousand people crowded to hear him, and hundreds were unable to obtain room." (The Evening News of San Jose, California, Jan. 24, 1908.)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, Feb. 2, 1908, Los Angeles, California:

"At the Christian Science lecture given by Bicknell Young, C.S.B., of Chicago at the Auditorium yesterday 4000 people, including the most representative in the city, were assembled, and more than 2000 were turned away." (The Los Angeles Herald, Feb. 3, 1908.)

 

Lecture by Frank H. Leonard, March 22, 1908, Indianapolis, Indiana

"Some time before the lecture began the doors [to the Grand Opera House] had to be closed to late-comers and a crowd as large as the one that filled the inside was turned away." (The Indianapolis News, March 23, 1908)

 

Lecture by Clarence C. Eaton, April 13, 1908, Los Angeles, California

"Hundreds were turned away at the lecture on Christian Science given by Clarence C. Eaton, C.S.B. at Simpson auditorium last night. As it was, more than 2000 managed to crowd into the auditorium." (The Los Angeles Herald, April 14, 1908)

 

Lecture by Edward A. Kimball, April 13, 1908, London England:

"I am sure Mrs. Eddy will be glad to hear that the lecture was a huge success. The crowds were greater than they have ever been before, but indeed they seem to progress in a geometric ratio. Unquestionably hundreds of people were turned away. I got to the hall a few minutes before eight with Mr. Kimball, and though the hall had been crammed hours before, the passages and staircases were still choked, and the crowds were going from one door to another in an effort to find places. Mr. Kimball spoke for an hour and forty minutes, and held his audience in the closest attention down to the very end. Hardly any one went out except a few people who probably had trains or something else to catch, and there was great and frequent applause." (Letter of Frederick Dixon to Adam Dickey, printed in the Christian Science Sentinel, May 9, 1908) "Under the auspices of the three London churches Edward A. Kimball of Chicago delivered a lecture for Third Church of Christ, Scientist, London, at Queen's Hall on April 13. The hall has a seating capacity of about three thousand and the lecture was announced for eight o'clock. The doors were opened at a quarter past seven, and in fifteen minutes nearly every seat was occupied. Half an hour later the nine entrances had to be closed, and crowd of many hundreds turned away in spite of their punctual arrival, as not a seat was to be had in any part of the vast hall. Such an attendance in this, the most popular concert hall in London, is without precedent except on the occasion of this Christian Science lecture." (The Christian Science Sentinel, June 20, 1908)

 

Lecture by Arthur R. Vosburgh, Oct. 18, 1908, Los Angeles, California:

"Rev. Arthur R. Vosburgh lectured for First Church of Christ, Scientist, of this city, Sunday, Oct. 18. On Sunday afternoon three thousand people crowded Temple Auditorium twenty minutes before the time for the lecture, and so many were turned away that the lecture was repeated at Simpson Auditorium on Monday evening." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, Dec. 12, 1908)

 

Lecture by Bicknell Young, Oct. 25, 1908, St. Louis, Missouri:

"Bicknell Young lectured on Christian Science at the Odeon Theater Oct. 25. About six hundred people were turned away for lack of room." (Correspondence published in the Christian Science Sentinel, Jan. 2, 1909)

 

Lecture by Bliss Knapp, Nov. 10, 1908, San Jose, California:

"The Victory Theater, with its spacious seating capacity, was crowded from footlights to the rear row of the gallery and scores were turned away last evening [Nov. 10]. A representative audience had gathered to listen to a lecture on the subject of Christian Science by Bliss Knapp of Boston." (The San Jose Mercury, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, Dec. 26, 1908)

 

Lecture by Francis J. Fluno, Nov. 22, 1908, Detroit, Michigan:

"On Sunday afternoon [Nov. 22] a public lecture on the teachings of Christian Science was delivered by one of the prominent lecturers of the organization, Francis J. Fluno, M.D., of Oakland, Cal. The Detroit Opera House, which seats twenty-three hundred, was crowded to the doors. More than that, about one thousand were turned away. There was, too, a striking uniformity in the audience which heard this lecture. It was an audience of nearly three thousand unusually well-dressed, thoughtful, intelligent men and women." (The Detroit Journal, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, Feb. 6, 1909)

 

Lecture by Frank H. Leonard, Dec. 13, 1908, Los Angeles, California:

"More than 5000 persons gathered at Shrine auditorium yesterday to hear the lecture of Frank H. Leonard, C.S.B., who expounded the tenets of Christian Science. The auditorium was croweded to its utmost capacity and many who desired to hear the eloquent address of Mr. Leonard were disappointed at not being able to gain admission to the hall." (The Los Angeles Herald, Dec. 14, 1908)

 

Lecture by Sue Harper Mims, December 1908-January 1909 (?), Cleveland, Ohio:

"I have just returned from dear beautiful Baltimore, having lectured there to the largest audience they have ever had. Rapt attention everywhere marks the Christian Science audiences. In Cleveland, O., a few weeks ago, there were five thousand present and hundreds turned away. The sad old earth is waking from its long lethargy, and the energizing Christ is rousing thought to grasp the eternal truth of being." (Letter dated Feb. 16, 1909 to Mary Baker Eddy from Sue Harper Mims, printed in the Christian Science Sentinel, March 6, 1909)

 

Lecture by Septimus J. Hanna, Feb. 28, 1909, Chicago, Illinois:

"Christian Science and what it teaches was explained yesterday afternoon [Feb. 28] at Orchestra Hall by Judge Septimus J. Hanna. There were fully twenty-five hundred people present and hundreds were turned away." (The Chicago Record-Herald, quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, April 3, 1909) "When Judge Hanna lectured in Orchestra Hall [in Chicago] last February, Sunday afternoon and Monday evening, two thousand people were turned away on Sunday afternoon." (From an article by John U. Higinbotham in the Christian Science Sentinel, Jan. 8, 1910)

 

Lecture by Septimus J. Hanna, Nov. 7, 1909, Portland, Oregon:

"'Christian Science, the Religion of the Bible,' was the subject of two lectures, delivered at the Masonic Temple yesterday afternoon and last night by Judge Septimus J. Hanna, C.S.D. Judge Hanna spoke to throngs on both occasions, the audience beginning to assemble long before the time for the lecture. At least 1200 heard the lecture in the afternoon, and as many last night. The hall seats 1000. Between 250 and 300 were turned away in the afternoon, and about 400 last night." (The Portland Oregonian, Nov. 8, 1909.)

 

Lecture by Bliss Knapp, Nov. 10, 1909, San Jose, California:

 "Every seat in the Victory Theater was occupied last evening and many people were turned away unable to secure standing room. It was the occasion of the lecture on Christian Science by Bliss Knapp, C.S.B., and a member of the Board of Lectureship of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston." (The San Jose Evening News, Nov. 11, 1908)

 

Lecture by Francis J. Fluno, Oct. 23, 1910, Indianapolis, Indiana:

"Francis J. Fluno, M.D., delivered a lecture on Christian Science in Murat Theater, Sunday afternoon, Oct. 23, before an audience of three thousand people, and it is estimated that fully two thousand people were turned away, unable to gain admittance to the theater."  (The Christian Science Sentinel, Dec. 10, 1910)

 

Lecture by Hermann S. Hering, Nov. 29, 1910, Seattle, Washington

"The lecturer who is to appear at the Wenatchee theatre tomorrow night created a sensation in Seattle yesterday. Prof. Hering was announced to speak at the Moore theatre at 3:00 o'clock in the afternoon. The big theatre was filled to utmost capacity of 3500 and 1500 people were turned away. To accommodate these an overflow meeting was held in the Christian Science church in the evening. The room was completely filled with an audience of 1500 attentive listeners." (The Wenatchee Daily World of Wenatchee, Washington, Nov. 30, 1910)

 

 

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